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THE LIFE OF CHARLES DICKENS

FIVE PERSONAL QUOTES

  • I begin to doubt whether I had anything to do with a book called "Dombey," or ever sat over number five (not finished a fortnight yet) day after day until I half began . . . to think it be only reality in life, and to mistake all the realities for shortlived shadows.

--Letter from Charles Dickens to the Countess of Blessington, January 24, 1847

  • You know my life..., and my character, and what has had its part in making them successful; and the more you see of me, the better perhaps you may understand that the intense pursuit of any idea that takes complete possession of me, is one of the qualities tbat makes me different -- sometimes for good; sometimes I dare say for evil -- from other men.

--Letter from Charles Dickens to his wife, December 5, 1853

  • I hold my inventive capacity on the stern condition that it must master my whole life, often have complete possession of me, make its own demands upon me, and sometimes for months together put everything else away from me. If I had not known long ago tbat my place could never be held unless I were at any moment ready to devote myse1f to it entirely, I sbould have dropped out of it very soon.... Whoever is devoted to an Art must be content to deliver himself wholly up to it, and to find his recompense in it.

    --Letter from Charles Dickens to Mrs. Winter, April 3, 1858

  • As to my art, I have as great a delight in it as the most enthusiastic of my readers; and the sense of my trust and responsibility in that wise, is always upon me when I take pen in hand. If I were soured, I should still try to sweeten the --Letter from Charles Dickens to Angela Burdett Coutts, April 10, 1860

  • It leaves me -- as my Art always finds and always leaves me -- the most restless of created Beings. I am the modern embodiment of the old Enchanters, whose Familiars tore them to pieces. I weary of rest, and have no -- satisfaction but in fatigue. Realities and idealities are always comparing themselves before me.... -- Letter from Charles Dickens to Mrs. Winter, December 7, 1857

MONIQUE KELLY, BRITISH LITERATURE, FAYETTE COUNTY EVENING HIGH SCHOOL